Skip to main content

Drone strikes take out key members of Somali terror group (JMD on Russia Today)


Members and supporters of the activist group CODEPINK dress in orange jumpsuits during a protest outside the National Defense University, where US President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak about his administration's counter terrorism policy, including the thorny issues of drone strikes and the future of the American prison at Guantanamo Bay, in Washington, DC.
Members and supporters of the activist group CODEPINK dress in orange jumpsuits during a protest outside the National Defense University, where US President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak about his administration's counter terrorism policy, including the thorny issues of drone strikes and the future of the American prison at Guantanamo Bay, in Washington, DC.

By Crystal Park
WASHINGTON (VOR) – Two members of the terrorist group al-Shabab have been killed by a U.S. military strike in Somalia.

It's a sign of growing U.S. anti-terrorism efforts in the region. Earlier in October, the U.S. Navy SEALS conducted a raid in Somali to take down a Kenyan al-Shabab member.
After the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the U.S. is evolving the way it fights terrorism. Instead of boots on the ground, targeted drone strikes are becoming the preferred method.
However, Dr. James Dorsey, senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, says although the U.S. prefers drone strikes because they're "cleaner" than boots on the ground, the drones present several problems.
"The problem with the drone strikes is that at times civilians or people not associated with the targets are among the casualties. The second thing is it really doesn't take into account what the facts on the ground are, what tribal relationships are. So often what these strikes do is they do take out a target...but at the same time, they could aggravate tensions on the ground, and have long-term consequences.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Turkey signals sweeping regional ambitions

Turkish shadow boxing reflects growing rivalry with Iran

Muslim scholar: Human rights policy needs to focus on religious scholars, not just activists